THE GREAT FLOOD OF 1998

October 20th will mark the 23rd Anniversary of the Flood of 1998! Back in October 1998, 30-plus inches of rain fell upriver in San Marcos and New Braunfels, which caused the Guadalupe River to crest at a historic high that has not been seen since.  The Guadalupe crested in Victoria at 33.85 feet at 2 p.m. on that Tuesday afternoon. October 20. The flood stage was 21 feet.

While those numbers were high, Cuero had it much worse. The Guadalupe River in Cuero crested at 49.8 feet in Cuero at 1 a.m. Tuesday morning, October 20, the flood stage was 20 feet.  There is one news image from the Cuero Flood that sticks with me until this day. The aerial footage of cows on the rooftop. Who remembers that?

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VICTORIA WAS A MEDIA FRENZY:

While Victorians were expecting a flood, I don't think anyone was thinking that it would be a severe as it was, myself included. I was in the mindset of 'the water has never been this high, 'we will be ok.' I was wrong!
I remember the town turning into a media circus. I grew up on Water St. right across from Urban's and the Washateria and the parking lot was filled with trucks from CNN, KENS-TV, and KPRC, just to name a few.  I also remember walking over the old Guadalupe River bridge on Moody St. and feeling the vibration from the rushing water. It was kind of scary.
SEE PHOTOS FROM THE FLOOD OF 1998 BELOW

A LOOK BACK TO THE FLOOD 98

A LOOK BACK AT HURRICANE HARVEY

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