The River Flood Warning for the Guadalupe River at Victoria has not only closed Riverside Park for now, but the heavy rains causing the flooding have brought with them a plague of mosquitos the size of nickels as well as an army of snakes and gators are all looking for temporary housing.

It's wild kingdom back here on North Star drive in Victoria. A couple of days ago one of our coworkers said they spotted a baby gator outback of the radio station. Of course, when the rest of us went to the window to look there was no sign of it.

Where Did It Come From?

We are not all that far off from Spring Creek, and when it rains the way it has the past week or so, all kinds of wildlife are looking for a dry place to rest. Wednesday afternoon, a few of us were out back of the radio station when we finally saw what our coworker was telling us about. The little baby gator is about two and a half feet long and likes to hiss at us when we get close enough for a photo. No sign of Mama at this time.

The Bog Out Back

If I'm a gator, that looks like a pretty nice place to call home. It's the bog that sits in the field next to our station and between the station and the backside of the Texas Concrete complex. This open outdoor area leaves a lot of space for stay cats, deer, and the occasional baby gator. We imagine that once the water drys up the little fella will find his way to someplace else. Perhaps back to Spring Creek.

Show Us Your Gator

With soggy ground all over town, we are not the only ones who have spotted some smaller gators who are on the move. Check out this photo from Dulce Flores who found this little fella resting under her car not two days ago! You can submit your photos via our free station app, or post them up on our Facebook page.

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Maybe forget the flip-flops this week and be sure to take a look around before you go wandering through the yard? As many already know, unless these critters are threatening you, there is a pretty good chance they will be leaving very soon and going back to someplace that better suits them. We don't imagine our gator will stay put for very long because of all the heavy equipment at Texas Concrete. What gator likes a giant tractor driving past its house 10 times a day?

We Can't Even Go Home

Behind the radio station, there is a fence and a tree line. The area beyond the tree line and behind the fence is covered in standing water. This had made the end of our street a mosquito hell, and a good place for Lil gator to hang out. Is mama back there in the woods? Well, something is because now the deer won't even go home. We arrived this morning to a few like the one in the photo above who had come out of the woods perhaps after a disagreement with their new neighbors? I'm not going back in there to find out.

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