Forty-three of our great fifty states already allow liquor sales in liquor stores on Sundays, but Texas just ain't one of them.

Considered, "Blue Laws," or "Sunday Laws," Texas still considers Sunday as a day when stores, like liquor stores, in this instance, should close due to religious purposes, with Sundays considered a day to worship and rest.

That might change soon thanks to Texas State House Representative Richard Raymond who has introduced HB 937, a new bill that if passed, would eliminate a ban implemented during prohibition on selling spirits on Sundays. 

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ABC News 13 reports "The bill would also extend the hours at package ( liquor) stores: Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m."

It wasn't long after Texas began to shut down during the mid months of the 2020 pandemic that Gov. Greg Abbott announced liquor to go might stay a "thing" as restaurants struggled to stay open and bars started to incorporate food in their menus to stay open. "From what I hear from Texans, we may just let this keep on going forever," said Abbott in a tweet posted at the time.

It's been written many times before that Texas has some of the most confusing and interesting laws on liquor sales in the nation with laws varying for the sale of beer, wine, and liquor in Texas. Not to mention our varying counties throughout Texas that are considered 'wet', 'dry', and 'wholly' dry. Texas Almanac 2015 has a map to help you keep it straight! You can read that here.

In an article written in the 'Texplainer' section of Texas Tribune, Texas Tribune breaks down some of the most confusing liquor laws in the state, like how Texas is the only state in the nation that bars publicly traded corporations from holding liquor permits. This is why you see liquor in almost every Wal-Mart in the nation except Texas.

House Bill 937 has been introduced, now let's see how South Texans feel about it. Cheers!

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